The NFL( or an entrepeneur) should create a minor football league

Discussion in 'GarryP's Trojan Huddle' started by flyfishintrojan, Aug 6, 2020.

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  2. Jay4usc

    Jay4usc Points Member


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    #2
    Average XFL salary is $55,000 without living and food expenses. Everything is paid for in college
     
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  3. flyfishintrojan

    flyfishintrojan Junior Member


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    #3
    But if they could siphon off some of college football’s best players, that number could rise. 10 teams, 2 QBed by Trevor Lawrence and Kedon Slovis, another maybe Bryce Young, JT Daniels, and you might have something.

    Actually, you would have something. Set the high age limit at 26. Graduated and expired eligibility kids not quite good enough to be NFLers, but still good, mixed in with 5 star non college kids and it could work. Try and make them regional teams too.
     
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  4. Troy70

    Troy70 Junior Member


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    #4
    I wouldn’t buy a ticket.
     
  5. 28thstreet

    28thstreet Junior Member


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    #5
    Anyone who watches a lot of SoCal high school football would love to see a game between California HS Football All Stars against the best from Texas, Florida, Alabama, Louisiana, Ohio, etc. If the XFL captures that talent, that would be amazing to watch. It would be the equivalent of watching AAA baseball (or G League Basketball) versus college baseball (or NCAA basketball now) -- college football wouldn't be dead, just different. Guys who really want to attend USC and be Trojans versus guys who just want to make a pit stop (and get paid pretty well to do it) on the way to the NFL. Win-win.
     
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  6. Jay4usc

    Jay4usc Points Member


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    #6
    How many people actually watch minor league baseball or basketball?
     
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  7. Troy70

    Troy70 Junior Member


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    #7
    Not buying minor league baseball or basketball.
     
  8. Peete2Affholter

    Peete2Affholter Junior Member


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    #8
    In markets where big league teams don't have a major presence, minor league teams do get some significant community support. If pro football had multiple tiers like baseball, and some small community had a choice between cheering for the local collegiate team full of privileged egg heads versus a minor league team full of potential NFL hopefuls, it might only take a successful season or two for fans to choose going to the minor-league games.
     
  9. flyfishintrojan

    flyfishintrojan Junior Member


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    #9
    How many people think professional college football is a winner? How many lawsuits are we going to see from women’s athletics demanding equal pay? The football players are going to get $100k/ year and no one is gonna sue? You would have to have been cryogenically frozen for the last 50 years and revived just yesterday not to know the answer to that.
     
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  10. 3rd Slide

    3rd Slide Junior Member


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    #10
    Exactly. A minor league football business will only last as long as it takes to burn through the initial seed money, not to mention player conditions will be about as brutal as in baseball's minor leagues. Oh, and no degree for players to fall back on after their playing days end.
     
  11. PacTrojan

    PacTrojan Junior Member


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    #11
    The NFL actually did have a minor league, its was NFL Europe.

    And as far as a US based NFL minor league they also already have one, it's called NCAA college football. There's no reason for the NFL owners to spend their money setting up a minor league as long as the college are willing to do it for them.

    The only way it could work would be for the NFL to set up this minor league and at the same time all of the NCAA D1-D3 schools agree that there would no longer be special admittance for athletes and that football players would have to meet the exact same admission requirements/standards as every other accepted student at a particular school. And slash the number of football scholarships, like what happened in college Baseball.
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2020
  12. 3rd Slide

    3rd Slide Junior Member


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    #12
    I actually like baseball’s rules about either going pro straight out of high school or committing to three years at a university.
     
  13. AMLTrojan

    AMLTrojan Junior Member


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    #13
    Or the XFL offers to pay for your online college courses. Get paid to play football AND still get a degree -- what's not to like?

    I'd like to see an expansive league covering the 100+ mid-sized metro areas that don't have pro sports teams, and set up a promotion/relegation system like European soccer.
     
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  14. AMLTrojan

    AMLTrojan Junior Member


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    #14
    Another way this could be made economically sustainable is if NFL teams can be allocated by lottery or draft order the ability to negotiate option rights on development league players.
     
  15. 3rd Slide

    3rd Slide Junior Member


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    #15
    Sounds great, I’ll bet that’ll have at least a 5% rate of success.
     
  16. Kaptain Karl

    Kaptain Karl Points Member


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    That’s where I see all of this going unfortunately. And it wont come close to college football. Maybe the competition is slightly better, but there’s a magic about college football that’ll be completely lost and it’ll never get the ratings that college football does.
     
  17. PacTrojan

    PacTrojan Junior Member


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    #17
    Back in the late 1990s Prof Andrew Zimbalist wrote the book "Unpaid Professional - Commercialism and Conflict in Big Time College Sports." It's available still on amazon and 20 + years still on point - even more so when you consider the money stats he cites have increased 100x.

    In his book he made a proposal that colleges should drop football and enter into an agreement with the NFL to license the school/team name and image to them to set up a minor league that would look just like college football on the outside. Big difference is it would be free of the NCAA rules, players would be paid and would not be students or actually go to the school, nor would they be employees of the school.

    From the 1999 release on the book by its publisher...
    -------
    Big-time college sports embodies the ideals of amateurism and provides an important complement to university education. Or so its apologists would have us believe. As Andrew Zimbalist shows in this unprecedented analysis, college sports is really a massively commercialized industry based on activities that are often irrelevant and even harmful to education. Zimbalist combines groundbreaking empirical research and a talent for storytelling to provide a firm, factual basis for the many arguments that currently rage about the goals, history, structure, incentive system, and legal architecture of college sports. He paints a picture of a system in desperate need of reform and presents bold recommendations to chart a more sensible future.​


    Zimbalist begins by showing that today's problems are nothing new--that schools have been consumed for more than a century by debates about cheating, commercialism, and the erosion of academic standards. He then takes us into the world of the modern student athlete, explaining the incentives that, for example, encourage star athletes to abandon college for the pros, that create such useless courses as "The Theory of Basketball," and that lead students to ignore classes despite the astronomical odds against becoming a professional athlete. Zimbalist discusses the economic and legal aspects of gender equity in college sports. He assesses the economic impact of television and radio contracts and the financial rewards that come from winning major championships. He examines the often harmful effects of corporate sponsorship and shows that, despite such sponsorship, most schools run their athletic programs at a loss. Zimbalist also considers the relevance of antitrust laws to college sports and asks whether student athletes are ultimately exploited by the system.​


    Zimbalist's provocative recommendations include eliminating freshman eligibility for sports, restricting coaches' access to "sneaker money" from corporations, and ending the hypocrisy about professionalism by allowing teams to employ a quota of non-students as well as to receive funding from the pro leagues. A mixture of lively anecdotes, hard economic data, cogent arguments, and clear analysis, Unpaid Professionals will revitalize debate about a subject close to the hearts and minds of millions of Americans.​
     
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  18. Peete2Affholter

    Peete2Affholter Junior Member


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    #18
    Yes, we all know that big time college football is an enormous money-maker for colleges, which is why coaches make salaries in the several millions per year, and the budgets of athletic programs are also huge.

    We also know that, from the perspective of a student-athlete, the deal is this: You sign with your school, hoping that this particular situation is one that gives you the best path to pro football and getting paid for the extraordinary skills you have developed pretty much since you were 7 years old. The school gives you the chance to earn a degree while you're playing and practicing, which makes your parents happy in the event (highly likely on a statistical basis) you don't make it to the pros.

    If this deal doesn't appeal to you, there are THOUSANDS of other high school legend hotshots ready to take your place, while you can go toil in obscurity in the CFL, or Arena football, or some semi-pro league with other NFL washouts and former college hopefuls and the like.

    None of those options have anywhere near the marketability and name recognition that playing for a major college, or even playing for a minor college against major colleges could afford you as a pro football hopeful. And, if all else fails (let's say you blow out your knee in your first freshman practice and your career is over) you are in an institution of higher learning where you have an educational opportunity many others simply don't have.
     
  19. TrojanHoss

    TrojanHoss Junior Member


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    #19
    WFL, USFL, Arena, XFL, XFL.2.

    Yep, if only some entrepreneur would come up with that idea.
     

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