Where would SC find Alabama type LBs and Dlinemen?

Discussion in 'GarryP's Trojan Huddle' started by flyfishintrojan, Jan 11, 2021.

  1. Daphantom99

    Daphantom99 New Member


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    Jan 14, 2021
    #41
    Helton has the team on the cusp of championship games. Those guys will flock to be coached by him soon... lol.
     
  2. Daphantom99

    Daphantom99 New Member


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    #42
    BTW... son of an OLine coach.
     
  3. Peete2Affholter

    Peete2Affholter Junior Member


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    #43
    So, instead of saying to someone you dislike, "You're a real SOB!" you instead say, "You're a real SOOLC!"
     
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  4. VegasPlayer

    VegasPlayer Junior Member


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    #44
    This,

    If you don't put in the work, they're 2-3 other guys in your position that are and a coach that doesn't play favorites.
     
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  5. nvargas

    nvargas Junior Member


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    #45
    The amount of players/starters on Bama's roster currently that are from Alabama is scary. It means Saban and his staff are so fantastic at player development that it no longer matters where he gets his players from. He no longer has to rely on Louisiana/Texas/FL/GA for all his talent. He's built a fence around Alabama and has his pick of top players from other states, and can develop them all.

    And as you mention, for every 4/5 star that doesn't develop, it means there were local 3-stars that wanted it more and surpassed those players above them...so you know they're battle-tested and hungry.

    It's a machine at this point, only limited by Saban's desire to stick around or find a successor that can keep the machine running.
     
  6. uscvball

    uscvball Junior Member


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    #46
    Yes, but in a way most don't typically consider.

    "Since 2017, 1292 high schools in Illinois produced only 936 Division I football players. Only 44% of those athletes ran track. By comparison, since 2017, Texas produced 3209 Division I football players. 71.5% ran track. Texas had more football commits run track (2371) than Illinois had D-I players (936). And it’s not getting any better in Illinois—in the class of 2021 (131 D-1 football commits), only 39% ran track.

    When you look at the combined rosters of Alabama and Ohio State, 88% of the DBs, 83% of the WRs, and 75% of the RBs ran track. 61% of all the players on both rosters had a track background....

    Every football coach loves fast players, but they see speed as a genetic trait. They love it…then neglect it. They hire big guys to serve as their strength and conditioning coaches. The University of Illinois just replaced their S&C coach. Their guy was a power lifter who would post pictures of his biceps while he bragged about the number of Illini football players who could bench 405 and clean 300 pounds. He also posted video clips of his athletes going through speed ladders with the hashtag #SlowFeetDontEat. The new Illini S&C guy goes by the name of “Tank.” Tank got married in a college weight room....

    Too many football coaches see the game through the lens of hard work and high effort, not the lens of maximum velocity and high outputs....

    Matt Rhea was quoted in a Stack article, How a Unique Speed Training Program Flipped the Fortunes of Indiana Football, saying what makes him revolutionary: “The old adage you can’t teach speed or you can’t develop speed in guys at this level is just highly inaccurate.” Also from the same Stack article: Rhea, along with IU Director of Football Performance Dave Ballou, arrived in Bloomington in January of 2018. Over the course of the next year, Indiana players saw their top running speed increase by an average of over 3 miles per hour. For those of you new to the miles per hour game, DK Metcalf ran 1.37 mph faster than Budda Baker in the famous rundown back in October 2020. When Rhea and Ballou went to Alabama, I told people that Alabama may never lose another game. Especially given the Neanderthal state of affairs in many S&C programs...

    You see, Alabama has always recruited the best athletes in the country. Unlike the NFL, where the worst teams are awarded the top draft picks, the best college programs get multiple first round picks every year. There’s nothing fair about recruiting. The rich get richer. Filthy rich. Bad teams are screwed. Alabama has always been rich in talent.

    But what happens when you train those future NFL players the right way? What happens when you stop doing s**t that makes players slow? What happens when speed becomes the priority and the weight room becomes a part of the plan, not the plan?

    “When you stop viewing the weight room as a place to break athletes down and start viewing it as a place to build them, your perspective on stress shifts from excess to optimal.” ~ Matt Rhea


    "... some of Tracking Football’s data showing the multi-sport connection to Alabama recruiting:

    • 73% of Alabama’s roster were multi-sport athletes in high school and 64% ran high school track.

    • This year’s Heisman Trophy winner, DeVonta Smith, was a track athlete and played high school basketball. 10.67 in the 100m. Also solid in the 400: 49.34. Smith is projected as a top ten pick in the NFL Draft.

    • The other projected top ten pick in the draft is Patrick Surtain II, who ran 10.87 in the 100m at American Heritage H.S. in Fort Lauderdale.

    • Jaylen Waddle missed most of the season with an ankle injury, but still projects as a first round pick. Waddle ran 10.84 in the 100m, and like many wide receivers, excelled as a long jumper (22’9”). Waddle also played basketball.

    • Quarterback Mac Jones will also likely get picked in the first round. Jones was not a multi-sport athlete in high school.

    • The fifth potential first-round pick coming out of Alabama this year will be 6’4” 310 pound DE Christian Barmore. Barmore was not a multi-sport athlete in high school.

    • At 226 pounds, Najee Harris played basketball and ran track in high school. 11.19 in the 100m.

    • Wide receiver John Metchie III played lacrosse at a high school in New Jersey.

    • Wide receiver Slade Bolden played baseball in high school.

    • 6’6” 320 pound offensive tackle Alex Leatherwood threw the shot put 49’3” in high school.

    • Center Chris Owens threw the shot 46’10” in high school.

    • 6’3” 327 pound Emil Ekiyor Jr. played basketball in high school.

    • 6’5” 242 pound tight end Miller Forristall ran a 52.53 400m in high school.

    • 6’4” 222 pound linebacker Christian Harris ran 11.53 in the 100m.

    • Starting CB Josh Jobe ran 10.90 in the 100m, 21.56 in the 200m, and ran on a super-fast 4×1: 40.97.

    • Safety Daniel Wright ran the 400m in 48.60, high jumped 6’4”, and long jumped 22’6”.

    • Safety Jordan Battle played basketball and ran the 200 in 22.21.

    Since 2010, Alabama has sent 143 players to the NFL. That’s an average of 14.3 per year, meaning that on any given Alabama roster, there’s probably 57 future NFL players.

    60% ran high school track. (The #1 best sport for building athleticism!)

    50% played high school basketball. (The second-best sport for building athleticism!)

    19 ran under 10.99 in the 100m.

    18 long jumped over 20 feet.

    10 threw the shot over 50 feet.

    Alabama will continue to recruit the best athletes in the country. Those participating in track and field will have verified athleticism and will have special value.

    But, everyone recruits the best athletes. Everyone recruits track athletes. Ohio State’s roster featured an incredible 78% multi-sport athletes. 57% of their roster ran track in high school.

    LSU’s Ed Orgeron went on the recruiting trail looking for track athletes as soon as they won last year’s national title. He had lots of work to do after FOURTEEN of LSU’s players were drafted by the NFL."

    https://simplifaster.com/articles/roll-tide-football-speed-model/
     
  7. Trojanfan1963

    Trojanfan1963 Points Member


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    Jan 15, 2021
    #47
    Lots of good information I hadn’t seen before, thanks for posting this!
     
  8. Trojack

    Trojack Junior Member


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    #48
    While the "youngsters" on the board might see this as a novel idea, this was, in fact, the way USC did business decades ago. Just during the time I was a student in the late 60s, nearly all of our football players were either multi-sport (successful) athletes in high school or ran track and field while on football scholarship here. In fact, it was almost expected that football players run track and field in the spring and track and field athletes try out for the football team.
     
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  9. JImmytheGreek

    JImmytheGreek Junior Member


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    #49
    All of this is above my pay grade but it is exactly the sort of thing about which Mike Bohn needs to be grilling head coaching candidates.
     
  10. AMLTrojan

    AMLTrojan Junior Member


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    #50
    Kids in the other lanes probably had the same impression I did running the 200m against DeShaun Foster: how can someone run that fast with that much muscle mass flopping around?!? Sprinters are toned, not beefy.
     
  11. uscvball

    uscvball Junior Member


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    #51
    World class sprinters are obviously not "beefy" but the point is, fast AND strong are not mutually exclusive. I suppose you felt the way these runners did when going against Nick Chubb.

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    "On an 88-yard touchdown run during the Browns' recent victory over the Baltimore Ravens, Chubb hit a top speed of 21.95 miles per hour. Only one ball carrier has clocked a faster foot speed so far this season.

    But Chubb's been a freaky athlete for a long time. Not only did he finish his career at Cedartown High School (Georgia) with nearly 7,000 rushing yards, but he was also a star track & field athlete.

    Chubb set a school record with a 10.69 PR in the 100-Meter Dash. Those muscles also helped him win a high school state title in the shot put. Chubb boasted an eye-popping 55-foot-8 PR in the event.

    At the 2018 NFL Combine, Chubb put up an impressive 29 reps in the Bench Press and posted a 38.5-inch Vertical Jump."
     
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  12. Peete2Affholter

    Peete2Affholter Junior Member


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    #52
    Eh - I remember seeing Michael Johnson run his gold-medal winning 200m sprint at the 1996 Atlanta Olympics and thinking, "that dude looks like a NFL fullback, not a WR!"

    I had always thought that most top recruits for football were generally multi-sport stars in HS. I know the guy who was voted "Most Athletic" in my HS class was not only a top football player, but was also a starting forward on the basketball team and was also a track star.
     
  13. AMLTrojan

    AMLTrojan Junior Member


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    #53
  14. AMLTrojan

    AMLTrojan Junior Member


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    #54
    I never said that they were mutually exclusive, but if Chubb and Foster were hoping to become Olympic-level track athletes, they absolutely had the wrong muscle mass optimization for that. My T&F teammate set state records for discus, and Foster looked like he could toss my teammate as far as my teammate could toss his discus.
     
  15. Peete2Affholter

    Peete2Affholter Junior Member


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    #55
    https://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.irishtimes.com%2Fpolopoly_fs%2F1.4283198.1592553003!%2Fimage%2Fimage.jpg_gen%2Fderivatives%2Fratio_1x1_w1200%2Fimage.jpg&imgrefurl=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.irishtimes.com%2Fsport%2Fother-sports%2Fmichael-johnson-urges-athletes-to-use-their-platforms-to-political-effect-1.4283199&tbnid=VOzTbx9VVE3NmM&vet=1&docid=1nV_Gy2DP4C6bM&w=1200&h=1200&source=sh%2Fx%2Fim

    This is what I remembered:

    To me he looked significantly beefier than most of the other sprinters in those Olympics. We had gotten so used to guys who were built more like Carl Lewis.

    FWIW I also remember Ben Johnson from Canada in the 1988 Olympics and how jacked he looked.

    Lol, guess we know why...
     
  16. AMLTrojan

    AMLTrojan Junior Member


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    #56
    FWIW I'm not saying Olympic sprinters aren't impressively muscular, but even Johnson on 'roids didn't look like Chubb or Foster. In general I think sprinters are less likely to look like RBs or LBs, rather more like WRs and DBs.
     

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