Public Service Message

Discussion in 'MKJ Off-Topic' started by The Mayor of Leah, Jan 16, 2018.

  1. GauchoGreg

    GauchoGreg Junior Member


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    Hey, guys, I'm looking for the Joe Biden appreciation thread. Anyone help out a brother?
     
  2. GauchoGreg

    GauchoGreg Junior Member


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    By the way, why do I have only 2 messages? I know I have been a shiddy member, but I know I posted here in the past. Did the Mayor demote me to zero?
     
  3. DJ4SC

    DJ4SC Junior Member


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    Hey there Gaucho, long time no see.

    Might want to check the thread on hemorrhoids and amoebas.

    Hope you’ve been well.
     
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  4. GauchoGreg

    GauchoGreg Junior Member


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    Love it.

    Hey, DJ... hope you have been well!
     
  5. DJ4SC

    DJ4SC Junior Member


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    They finally got around to weaponizing the IRS again. Anyone else still think that boathouse Barry isn’t behind all this? One day closer to watering the Tree Of Liberty....



    WASHINGTON—The U.S. government is losing some $1 trillion in unpaid taxes every year and needs more and consistent Internal Revenue Service funding to go after tax cheats, IRS Commissioner Charles Rettig said on Tuesday.

    Rettig told the Senate Finance Committee that the “tax gap”—the difference between taxes legally owed and revenue collected—has grown substantially since the last official estimate of a $441 billion annual average from 2011 to 2013.

    New sources of wealth arising since then, such as trading in cryptocurrencies, were escaping taxation, he said, as was rising foreign-sourced income and abuses of business income passed through as personal income.

    “If you add those in, I think it would not be outlandish, that the actual tax gap could approach, and possibly exceed $1 trillion” on an annual basis, Rettig said.

    Rettig said the agency is “outgunned” by increasingly sophisticated tax avoidance schemes, while years of budget cuts have left it with about 17,000 fewer revenue enforcement staff than it had a decade ago.

    He called for Congress to provide “consistent, timely, adequate and multiyear funding.”

    President Joe Biden’s fiscal 2022 budget request would boost the IRS budget by about $1.3 billion, or 10.4 percent over current levels. The proposed $13.2 billion IRS budget would include an additional $900 million for tax enforcement in fiscal 2022, which starts on Oct. 1.

    The Treasury has made closing the tax gap a priority, recently hiring Natasha Sarin, a Wharton School economist who is an expert on the topic.

    The tax gap represents underreported income, underpayment or nonpayment of taxes owed and exaggeration of claimed tax breaks such as deductions and credits.

    One suggestion that Rettig made to senators to capture more unreported income would be legislation requiring that transactions in cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin be reported, similar to the way that securities transactions are reported on 1099 forms.

    These reports would help the IRS to tax capital gains in lightly regulated cryptocurrency investments, which now have a market capitalization of around $2 trillion, Rettig said.

    The IRS chief also said that the agency would be ready to open a portal on July 1 for low-income Americans to sign up to receive monthly payments of an expanded Child Tax Credit under Biden’s $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief package.

    The credit, which will provide six months of payments of $3,600 for children under 6 years of age and $3,000 for those 6 to 17, puts the revenue agency into the position of benefits administrator for the first time. Rettig said the new monthly payment system, which is temporary, will cost about $391 million and take 300 to 500 people to administer, including more phone service personnel and fraud investigators.

    https://www.theepochtimes.com/irs-chief-says-1-trillion-in-taxes-goes-uncollected-every-year_3774538.html
     
  6. SC in DE

    SC in DE Points Member


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    Right! And what about all the time and energy the agency saves due to: electronic filing (that confirms all math work for the agent), the simplified 1040 under Trump that took away many peoples use of Schedule A, and the reduction of SALT?

    I guess this didn't help with man hours (people hours or whatever you are "suppose" to say not)
     
  7. CrownoftheValley

    CrownoftheValley Junior Member


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    Welcome back... if you plan on staying...
     
  8. CrownoftheValley

    CrownoftheValley Junior Member


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    It never stops
     
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  9. GauchoGreg

    GauchoGreg Junior Member


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    Yeah, I'm absolutely the most swamped in my life right now... both with work and two teenagers in sports. My wife just logged out our calendar, and we have 29 lacrosse games to go to in the next 40 days. But, yeah, I'll try to stick around.
     
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  10. CrownoftheValley

    CrownoftheValley Junior Member


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    Good to see you again
     
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  11. CrownoftheValley

    CrownoftheValley Junior Member


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    Apr 14, 2021
    MediaWatch

    The Press Is Infrastructure for Biden

    By Tim Graham
    Published April 14, 2021

    Sen. John Cornyn came under blistering attack from Washington Post scribe Aaron Blake for having wondered whether President Joe Biden is really in charge, since he's kept an extremely low profile with the press. Blake took after the senator for implying the Trump spin that old Joe has lost a few mental gears and is something of a "Manchurian Candidate." "It's a baseless and ugly bit of innuendo," Blake wrote.

    On Twitter, Cornyn linked to a Politico story in which writer Eugene Daniels noted: "The president is not doing cable news interviews. Tweets from his account are limited and, when they come, unimaginably conventional. The public comments are largely scripted. Biden has opted for fewer sit down interviews with mainstream outlets and reporters." He's had one press conference during his 84 days in office.

    One obvious explanation for the Biden strategy is his tendency to insert his foot in his mouth. But it's also obvious that he has zero fear of his low availability to the press being a problem with "mainstream" reporters, since about 99.96% of them surely voted for him in November.

    Most Americans are relieved that the president's tweets are "unimaginably conventional." But the press slid back to its Obama-era tone, championing sappy Biden tweets about his love for his wife, "Jilly," and Jilly's buying treats at black-owned bakeries. White House chief of staff Ron Klain routinely retweets the "mainstream" reporters, implying that he endorses their helpful pro-Biden spin.

    Ex-CNNer Steve Krakauer pointed out that Klain retweeted PBS White House reporter/repeater Yamiche Alcindor, who happily quoted Biden as saying that he is redefining infrastructure "to meet the aspirations of the American people and their needs."

    Reporters are helping Biden redefine bipartisanship as ignoring congressional Republicans and citing poll findings that show regular Republicans approve of his mega-spending bills. As if Republicans would answer "no" if asked, "Do you support COVID-19 relief?"

    Normally, we could explain the press's tone changes this way: When Republicans are in power, members of the press sound like Complainers, isolating problems and suggesting America is being governed badly. When Democrats take charge, the press becomes full of Explainers, who say everything is running smoothly and the only problem with governing is that those maddening Republicans aren't as docile as reporters.

    This framework doesn't work with Donald Trump. They sound like Explainers now, but under former President Trump, they weren't Complainers. They were ... Screechers. They sounded like panicked doomsayers on street corners, wearing "The End Is Near" sandwich boards. We were in never-ending danger of dictatorship and then, in 2020, of sudden death.

    Blake was furious that anyone would suggest Biden isn't in control ... even though his Washington Post routinely sought out anonymous sources to warn readers that Trump was dangerously out of control. His newspaper's new slogan was a primal scream. Its goal was to remove Trump — as early as it could. Everyone on its side was Team Democracy. Everyone who supported Trump was Team Autocracy.


    This is why most Americans have grasped the obvious, easily quantifiable fact that the "mainstream" media is actually the "Demstream" media. Republicans disapprove of the media, and Democrats approve of the media for the same reason. Their function is to create the best conditions for "social change," and glowing poll numbers for Democrats and their leftist agenda.

    That's why Biden doesn't have to take the low risk of a sappy interview with Norah O'Donnell or Lester Holt. He doesn't have to call up Steve Inskeep at NPR for a shoeshine.

    Everyone in the "news" business is satisfied. He can pretend that it's still 2020 and he's safely running a pseudocampaign from Wilmington, Delaware.

    The press is now just "infrastructure" for Biden, evolving "to meet the aspirations of" the president and his needs.

    http://jewishworldreview.com/0421/graham041421.php3
     
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  12. DJ4SC

    DJ4SC Junior Member


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    We are in the last days....


    Why are pandemics so hard to stop? Often it’s because the disease moves faster than people can be tested for it. The Defense Department is helping to fund a new study to determine whether an under-the-skin biosensor can help trackers keep up — by detecting flu-like infections even before their symptoms begin to show. Its maker, Profusa, says the sensor is on track to try for FDA approval by early next year.

    The sensor has two parts. One is a 3mm string of hydrogel, a material whose network of polymer chains is used in some contact lenses and other implants. Inserted under the skin with a syringe, the string includes a specially engineered molecule that sends a fluorescent signal outside of the body when the body begins to fight an infection. The other part is an electronic component attached to the skin. It sends light through the skin, detects the fluorescent signal and generates another signal that the wearer can send to a doctor, website, etc. It’s like a blood lab on the skin that can pick up the body’s response to illness before the presence of other symptoms, like coughing.

    The announcement comes as the United States grapples with COVID-19, a respiratory illness that can present in flu-like symptoms such as coughing and shortness of breath. The military is taking a leading role in vaccine research, Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Gen. Mark Milley told reporters at the Pentagon on Monday. “Our military research labs are working feverishly around the horn here to try to come up with a vaccine. So we’ll see how that develops over the next couple of months,” Milley said. U.S. troops themselves are also at risk. A U.S. soldier in South Korea became the first U.S. service member to contract the virus, the Wall Street Journal reported in February.


    Related: The Official Numbers on the Coronavirus Are Wrong, and Everyone Knows It

    Profusa’s newest funded study, which the company announced on Tuesday, will test how well the sensor can detect influenza outbreaks up to three weeks before it’s possible to detect them using current methods. Because the gel doesn’t actually emit any signal, it wouldn’t give away a soldier’s position, so the sensor could be used in sensitive settings like behind enemy lines, Profusa CEO Ben Hwang said.

    Hwang said his company has received grants from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, or DARPA, since around 2011. “They gave us grant money to help our research and as we prove out a certain milestone, as we de-risk the technology, they give us a second phrase and a third phase and provide support,” he said. “Their support has transitioned from grants into these types of programs that create real-world evidence.”

    Hwang said DARPA is helping the company reach out to other outfits within the Defense Department that might use the device on troops or servicemembers. That could include partnerships with U.S. Special Operations Command, for instance, or, Indo-Pacific Command. He declined to comment on conversations with specific military customers.

    https://www.defenseone.com/technology/2020/03/military-funded-biosensor-could-be-future-pandemic-detection/163497/
     
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